the anorexia myth →

mirandasbody:

"anorexics don’t eat"

of course we fucking eat. if we didn’t eat we’d be dead. and yes for some of us it does get to that stage. But seriously 90% of people with EDs who say they ‘dont eat’ or put out that they live off an apple a day, eat more than that. Many diagnosed…

I needed to hear this.

fashionsfromhistory:

Wedding Dress

Spiegel for Neymar

1976

This romantic wedding dress was worn by Angela Stamp for her marriage to her best friend, Howard Fineman, on the hottest day recorded in years, 15 August 1976. The design was inspired by a costume for Anne Boleyn in the film ‘Anne of the Thousand Days’ (1969). Angela describes how the designer ‘immediately understood my dream. She and my mother talked me into softening the period style and using the idea of a crinoline to make it more bridal’. There were gasps from the wedding guests when they caught sight of the bride walking down the aisle.

V&A

asoiafuniversity:

iamnotdoingshittoday:

A Mapped History of A Song of Ice and Fire by u/hotbrownDoubleDouble

mod note: While there are multiple typos in these images (“Roynar” should be Rhoynar, “Durrandon” should be Durrendon, “Gardiner” should be Gardener, and “the last native king” in the seventh image should be “the last Riverlands king”), this is nevertheless a very useful resource of pre-Conquest history.

(via tuberkiin)

dynamicafrica:

DOCUMENTARY: “The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords.”
In a world where segregation was back both by laws and social attitudes, it’s no surprise that the mainstream press in the United States served as a reflection of these ills.
Knowing firsthand the impact of words and images as weapons against their welfare, black people in the United States knew that left in the hands of racist publications, their representation, history, culture and identities would forever be at stake. Starting with communities and individuals of free black people in the 1800s, to the birth of more contemporary publications like Ebony, the power of images and the written word of black people by black people, and in the interests of black people, has always been an act of self-preservation.
This documentary brings to light a powerful and engaging account of American history that has been virtually forgotten: the story of the pioneering black newspapermen and women who gave voice to black America. 
Watch it here.
FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | PINTEREST | BLOG

dynamicafrica:

DOCUMENTARY: “The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords.”

In a world where segregation was back both by laws and social attitudes, it’s no surprise that the mainstream press in the United States served as a reflection of these ills.

Knowing firsthand the impact of words and images as weapons against their welfare, black people in the United States knew that left in the hands of racist publications, their representation, history, culture and identities would forever be at stake. Starting with communities and individuals of free black people in the 1800s, to the birth of more contemporary publications like Ebony, the power of images and the written word of black people by black people, and in the interests of black people, has always been an act of self-preservation.

This documentary brings to light a powerful and engaging account of American history that has been virtually forgotten: the story of the pioneering black newspapermen and women who gave voice to black America. 

Watch it here.

FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | PINTEREST | BLOG